How it all started


Hello, hi! I want to start this blog by thanking everyone who follows me on social media, comments, and support my work. I wouldn't be where I am today without all of you to back me up. And if you happen to read these entries, well that's just the cherry on top!

I'm not a writer by any means, and blogging is not something I will be doing ever so often. I will mostly use this so you can learn a little more about me (I realize I REALLY suck at doing this), and read about different photoshoots I've done and projects I have going on. Starting with the story of my road to becoming a wedding photographer and floral designer. This entry will be talking about the photography part. So sit back, enjoy and maybe learn from my experiences! (This post turned out to be much longer than I expected, you should get comfortable!)


I started having an interest in photography when I was a teenager. Back then, MySpace was huge and and we were all very invested with our profile photos. You just HAD to have that cool concept with the props and awesome hair. At first, I'd just use my mom's film camera to take photos of my sister in graveyards (wish I made that up), or in our yard. Then, in High School, one of our classes in art class was to actually learn the basics of photography and to develop films. You would think that I got hooked and never let go of a camera since? You'd be very wrong. I butchered the class! Did not care one bit. I was just a kid that was tired of being seen as a nerd, so I ended not paying attention in a lot of my classes. No matter how interesting it was, I actively did as little as possible.


I think what really sparked something was when I'd be going to local shows with my friends. They all had those point and shoot digital cameras and always took so many cool photos. I only had my mom's 35mm. But one time, I decided to take it to a show so I could have my own photos. Didn't think much of it, not did I expect them to look decent. But to my big surprise, when they came back, I realized they were good. Even better than what my friends could do. So I instantly figured I'd have really cool photos with a digital camera. I asked my mom and she agreed to buy us one.


I had no idea how it worked, all I'd do is click and hope for the best. Those cameras were really simple back then so it's not like there was much I could do with it anyways. I kept taking it to shows and enjoying the process. The selfie game also started getting much better. I was having a lot of fun. So much so that at one point, my mom asked me if that's something I'd like to study in the future. I was 17, had no idea what I was going to do with my life so I simply brushed it off, saying that it wasn't really a job. Now that I think back, I think it's because I associated photography to weddings or landscape. Two things I couldn't picture (pun intended) myself doing.


Then came then end of High School, and time for more grown up decisions. I was working at a skate shop / clothing store at the time and I loved my job. And since I didn't really have anything else to fall back on, I decided to study sales and representation. Throughout my studies, we often had to pick a subject or a field in which to focus our projects, sales pitch, etc. I had recently upgraded my point and shoot for a larger one. So one time I decided to make a project on that camera. So I started researching and the more I was reading, the more I discovered how many options and settings a camera could have. I also quickly discovered that none of those were available on my camera. At this point, my interest in photography was pretty obvious. So I talked to my mom about it, and she agreed to help me buy my first DSLR. A Nikon D80, with a 50mm f1,8.

Baby me with my Nikon D80!

For the rest of my studies, everything I did had something to do with photography. I even got my final internship at a camera store downtown Montreal. I learned a lot by simply using it. Shooting people, things, our cats, my sister. Anything. It's all I ever wanted to do. Then came my final school project, which was a presentation on a company. We had to pretend to be working from them and make a pitch on either a service or product. My presentation was about my Nikon D80. By that time, I had gathered a lot of knowledge about the camera itself and photography in general. So what was I going to do with all this? College was an option. But remember when I said I didn't like being a nerd? Yeah, turns out I don't really like school altogether. No there was no way I was going to sit through 3 years of college. Trade school was available, but the school was 2 hours away from home. Didn't want to relocate. I made more research and found this private photography college. Studies were shorter, but way out of budget. So I settled on a 3 months class for studio work. And just from that, I learned a TON. Studio flashes were something I wasn't used to, so that extra knowledge was great for a while. But it wasn't enough.


Then, like some sort of miracle, something happened that changed everything. The trade school that was offering photography announced they were opening a division in the Montreal Area. When I tell you I RAN to sign up! Even better news came shortly as I found out I was admitted. 1 year and a half and I'd hold a photography diploma. Life was good.


I was then 19 years old and ready to rock the photography world. Literally, as I quickly realized how passionate I was about shooting live concerts. Little bit of background, I had been hanging out a shows a lot, my boyfriend at the time was a musician and so were most of my friends. I was lucky to have easy access to multiple shows so that's how I started practicing. Got acquainted with promoters and bands and was allowed to bring my camera. I had been doing it for fun for quite some time when I decided to randomly apply to a Canadian online magazine I loved to read. Truth Explosion Magazine. Based in Toronto, they would cover concerts of various artists of the metal, punk and hardcore scene all across Canada. I had nothing to lose, so I went for it. And to my surprise, they hired me! Was money involved? Absolutely not! Did I care? Not even the slightest. As a young rookie, any experience I could get in such a 'selective' world was good enough for me. I went on to shoot for TEM for a couple of years. Some of my favourite memories happened at the bottom of a stage, in the press section. HeavyMTL, Osheaga, Vans Warped Tour, multiple venues including the Molson Amphitheatre in Toronto were moments and places that forever changed me. From the way I shoot to how I conduct myself as a professional photographer. I am forever grateful for these experiences and I will treasure them for the rest of my life.

City and Colour in Toronto, 2010

Avenged Sevenfold, HeavyMTL 2010

But like many other good things, it had to come to an end. I was done with school, was working full time at a photo studio and the late nights of shooting concerts were starting to take a toll on me. It was really hard to let go, but I had to.

Then, the studio work became very consuming. I'm sure most artists can relate, but when you are forced to follow specific guidelines, and your passion is turned to overachieving in order to please The Big Boss, a part of you breaks. I had no fun, and my love for photography was slowly dying.


And then it happened. I quit. All of it.


I needed something to get me out of it, so I went back to retail and became a manager. That lasted for a couple of years. I let my camera in its bag, tucked away somewhere in the corner of my closet. I was freshly living on my own in Montreal and I needed to pay the bills. My retail job was good, I was making money, and I was happy like that.


During that same time, I met my now husband. It's a very long story, but he's British and we had a long distance relationship until he moved here nearly 5 years ago. Why is this important? Because in order for him to move here legally, the only logical option was to get married. And so he proposed. And it wasn't until I had to plan my wedding and find a photographer that I realized how silly it is for a photographer, to pick one for their wedding. Good thing my wonderful friend Ariann (which I met working at the studio) was available and agreed to take our photos!

But like many other good things, it had to come to an end. I was done with school, was working full time at a photo studio and the late nights of shooting concerts were starting to take a toll on me. It was really hard to let go, but I had to.

Then, the studio work became very consuming. I'm sure most artists can relate, but when you are forced to follow specific guidelines, and your passion is turned to overachieving in order to please The Big Boss, a part of you breaks. I had no fun, and my love for photography was slowly dying.


And then it happened. I quit. All of it.


I needed something to get me out of it, so I went back to retail and became a manager. That lasted for a couple of years. I let my camera in its bag, tucked away somewhere in the corner of my closet. I was freshly living on my own in Montreal and I needed to pay the bills. My retail job was good, I was making money, and I was happy like that.


During that same time, I met my now husband. It's a very long story, but he's British and we had a long distance relationship until he moved here nearly 5 years ago. Why is this important? Because in order for him to move here legally, the only logical option was to get married. And so he proposed. And it wasn't until I had to plan my wedding and find a photographer that I realized how silly it is for a photographer, to pick one for their wedding. Good thing my wonderful friend Ariann (which I met working at the studio) was available and agreed to take our photos!

My wedding, taken by AriannBT in February 2015

Not long after, I started to think about it all. Weddings. I know what you're thinking "but you said you didn't see yourself doing that". Yeah, I know. I also didn't think I'd get married at 25 to someone living halfway across the world. Yet there I was.

My work situation wasn't going very well in that time period. I had been let go of job and that hurt my ego a lot. I still managed to get another job in retail. But I was slowly starting to realize that I was missing out on a part of myself that I had put aside for too long.

Then, just like that, I had a crazy idea. I found a couple that was willing to let me shoot their wedding at an (insanely!!) low cost just so I could test the waters. It was STRESSFUL. I didn't have nearly enough gear to do it but I managed. The photos even came out very well! I enjoyed it, so I decided I could do it again.


So, I scored another one. My sister's friend was getting married and she thought of me. I increased my price, while still keeping it low. And then someone I knew was getting married so they hired me. Shortly after came my first wedding for a couple that had seen my work, but didn't know me previously. That was my first high paying wedding. From there, I never looked back. The more I was shooting, the more I was learning. I was acquiring more knowledge, more skills, more technique and more gear!


That first wedding was in 2015. Today is March 16th 2021 and business has been great ever since. I've expended my activities to couples, engagements and family photography as well. I enjoy every single minute of it. Every wedding I've shot has been a wonderful experience. I've met incredible people along the way, made friends and connections. It is truly a blessing to be able to do this for all of you. It's been quite the journey to get there and I still have a long road ahead. Who knows where it will take me!


But wherever that is, I'll enjoy the ride.


With love,

Vero



** The following photos are from my early work then some recent ones! Due to the pandemic, my booking had been put on hold for 2020. Excited to get back at it for 2021-2022! Also, a rare sight, a photo of me :) **

My first wedding in 2015. The bride had a red dress!

Second wedding, 2016

Third wedding, 2016

Elopement in Vegas, 2019

Adrienne & Cory, 2019

Me in Valley Of Fire, 2019

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